Why you should never take sides in the war between term and whole life insurance

A Flakebook friend of mine is up in arms about Amazon shutting down some user accounts and denying access to ebooks those users purchased.

I’m no legal expert but I think the user agreement for that stuff includes limited access rights to ebooks which can be revoked at any time so… it’s not like buying a physical book.

It’s more like buying a membership to a club which can be canceled by the company.

Sort of like how when you pay for Netflix or Hulu, HBO GO or whatevs, you’re paying for access to content. You’re not actually buying the movies and T.V. shows.

Anywho, what’s funny about all this is people are taking sides in this issue.

Some people support Amazon. Other people support Google. Still other support Apple and… everyone believes their chosen brand is better than the other.

But… Jeff Bezos?

He invested in his primary rival instead of taking sides.

Even tho he owns Amazon, he bought shares of Google way back in 1998.

So, even if Amazon failed, he’d still be a billionaire.

This reminds me of how so many people get stuck believing in their “side” — either whole life insurance or term insurance — and then try to sell you on joining that one side to the exclusion of the other.

Me?

I’m not taking sides.

I recommend you buy both term and whole life insurance, each for its own strategic benefit.

Moving right along…

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David Lewis

This post brought to you by //The Rogue Agent//. David has been a life insurance agent, and worked with some of the oldest and most respected mutual life insurance companies in the U.S., since 2004. Learn more about him and his business, here.

This post brought to you by //The Rogue Agent//. David has been a life insurance agent, and worked with some of the oldest and most respected mutual life insurance companies in the U.S., since 2004. Learn more about him and his business, here.